Friday, 6 April 2007

Short Break Again

Apologies for this but owing to Easter and guests using my computer room, there won't be any more posts until Monday probably. Have a fine weekend, whatever you're doing.

I was tempted to use this space to moan about Alan Johnson and his thoughtful dismissal of research suggesting that small children might be better off at home as "ludicrous" - but I can't be bothered. The man, to judge from his recent statements, clearly has some kind of family agenda which I can't bear but there's nothing I can do about it now. It's a lovely day and it's not a day for feeling angry with politicians - instead I should be meditating on the sacrifice of Christ.

Come to think about it, it's a perfect day for moaning about politicians. That Pontius Pilate, what a bastard. Still, with his "What is truth" stuff he'd fit brilliantly into any university humanities dept.

6 comments:

james higham said...

Pontius Pilate, the complete bastard! He wouldn't know what truth was if it bit him on the arse.

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

tin drummer, you are wonderful! Only came over to say "Happy Easter" but of course once I started reading your posts I couldn't stop! Auguri dalla Sicilia.

Delicolor said...

Meditate all you want- but I'm going to eat Easter eggs...

Crushed by Ingsoc said...

Still a line I've not made my mind up about.
Is Pilate's question genuine or rhetorical?
Certainly Medieval commentators regarded Pilate s one of the most damned of the damned. I have a very gloomy mystery play about Pilate being thron into thhe Tiber and the river not accepting his body. Many other tracts such as he Navigatio Sancti Brendani and the Divine Comedy likewise regard him as th arch traitor.
But is this perspective fair?

james higham said...

Pilate's question possibly began seriously but then he was called away by events and never got back to it.

Crushed by Ingsoc said...

That's how I feel, James. I think maybe our predecessors had him wrong, though usually I find myself more inclined to heed the wisdom of the ages on theological issues.